Boeing resumes 737 Max production following temporary suspension earlier this year

Technology

Boeing landed in a deep crisis following two fatal crashes of its 737 Max in October 2018 and March 2019. Soon after airlines began grounding the plane, the company said that it would temporarily suspend production of the aircraft in January 2020 and fired its CEO a week after making this announcement.
Boeing and its best-selling 737 Max have had the worst couple of years in recent memory after technical glitches, rooting back to the plane’s development cycle, led to two crashes and an indefinite grounding period.

The company’s manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington, made for quite a unique sight following these incidents, where it had to park many jetliners in employee car parks as they awaited a software fix and approval from aviation authorities to restart flights.

Although the plane still hasn’t received FAA’s permission to resume passenger service, likely delayed further due to the discovery of another, unrelated safety issue, Boeing recently announced that it had resumed production of the aircraft at its Renton factory, albeit at a low rate and under the implementation of more than a dozen initiatives focused on enhancing workplace safety and product quality.

“During the temporary suspension of production that began in January, mechanics and engineers collaborated to refine and standardize work packages in each position of the factory. New kitting processes will also ensure that employees have everything they need at their fingertips to build the airplane,” noted the company’s official statement.

Boeing plans to gradually ramp up production of its 737 program and says that the steps it’s taken at the factory will help it in achieving 100 percent quality for customers while ensuring workplace safety.

Things have also been looking up for the company elsewhere. Earlier this year, it successfully completed the maiden test flight of its 777-9X; the world’s largest twin-engined jet. Meanwhile, in the military domain, the company’s Australian arm recently unveiled the country’s first locally made combat drone called the Loyal Wingman.